November 30, 2021

discovery of an “adapted company”, with 70% of employees in

Yépi Chwit is what we call an “adapted company”. This means that at least 55% of its staff are disabled. The company was created in 2018 by Apajh. It represents an opportunity for job seekers with disabilities.



A company like any other, with the difference of being more inclusive. In Rémire-Montjoly, just behind the Auguste Dédé college, is Yépi Chwit. This adapted company, created by the Association Pour Adults et Jeunes Handicapés (Apajh) of Guyana, specializes in catering. The services offered are as follows: meal preparation and delivery, meal and cocktail trays to companies, associations, individuals and even to nurseries. What sets Yépi Chwit apart from other companies is that more than half of its employees are people with disabilities..

Kitchens by Yépi Chwit / Yépi Kaz



©Ludmïa Lewis

What is an adapted company?

In a so-called “adapted” company, employees with disabilities benefit from working conditions adapted to their abilities. People with disabilities must represent at least 55% of the workforce. In the case of Yépi Chwit, this figure is 70%. These companies receive state subsidies for fitting out their premises and financial aid for the salaries of employees. The latter also receive support for their professional projects.

Kitchens of the adapted company Yépi Chwit

Kitchens of the adapted company Yépi Chwit



©Ludmïa Lewis

Unlike establishments and work assistance services (ESAT), employees of adapted companies do not benefit from medico-social or educational support and are subject to the same rules as all other employees. To join an adapted company, people with disabilities must go through Pôle emploi, Cap emploi or their local mission or meet various criteria to go directly through the company.

A work environment adapted to disabilities

To Yépi Chwit, most of the employees are on permanent contracts and a few are on fixed-term contracts. To be hired, employees went through a procedure “quasi-classic, according to the candidate’s criteria and according to the availability of the position“, according to the explanations of Steeve Ferreira, technical sales representative at Yepi Chwit. Over time, and as its name suggests, the company has had to adapt to its employees.

We have people with visual impairments, for whom we have to print documents in bulk, to facilitate their visibility. We also have a person who needs a sit-stand seat because they cannot stand. In addition, we make a maximum of forklifts available because some people cannot carry heavy things.

Steeve Ferreira, technical sales representative at Yépi Chwit

Steeve Ferreira, sales technician at Yépi Chwit

Steeve Ferreira, sales technician at Yépi Chwit



©Ludmïa Lewis

An advantage for customers

Yépi Chwit employees, seven people in total, cook and deliver meals to businesses and individuals but also to Apajh employees. The latter go to the company self-service, where a terrace has recently been set up to accommodate them. Meals are also intended for interns and externs of the Yépi Kaz Medical Educational Institute., which welcomes children with multiple disabilities. The establishment is located in the same premises as Yépi Chwit and Apajh.

The terrace of the Yépi Chwit establishment

The terrace of the Yépi Chwit establishment



©Ludmïa Lewis

For external client companies, it is an advantage to work with Yépi Chwit. “It allows companies to deduct this tax they must pay if they do not have enough people with disabilities in their team“, explains Steeve Ferreira. He continues:”Some companies just want to participate in the professional inclusion of these people.”

If you want to do the same, know that European Disability Employment Week is happening right now and everyone can contribute. Events on the issue of employment for people with disabilities take place throughout the week.